About this Tour

Cruise sheer-walled fjords, be amazed by majestic icebergs, walk through diverse landscapes from windswept shorelines to sub-Arctic summits. Xplore rare geological oddities that earned Gros Morne UNESCO World Heritage status, listen to tales of Vikings and relax amid the culture and hospitality of Newfoundland’s coastal communities. 

Activity Level

Tours require a greater level of physical activity. Walking tours of cities are leisurely but you should be prepared to be on your feet for several hours and walk longer distances which may be over uneven ground and steps, climb in and out of zodiacs or small boats without assistance. This tour may include some activities not suitable for people with mobility restrictions.

What's Included

  • 2 night stay in Rocky Harbour, Port au Choix & St. Anthony
  • Gros Morne National Park
  • L’Anse Aux Meadows UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Port au Choix National Historic Site
  • Red Bay National Park, UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Guided Interpretive Walks
  • Trout River Interpretive Centre
  • Jacob A. Crocker House, Museum
  • Tea & Biscuits at Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse
  • Point Riche Lighthouse
  • Viking Experience
  • Iceberg Alley
  • Taste of Basque History
  • Ferry to/from Labrador
  • Western Brook Pond Boat Tour
  • Bonne Bay Kayaking Tour 
  • Iceberg & Whale Watching Boat Tour
  • Roundtrip airport transfers *on start and end dates only*
  • Porterage (1 suitcase)

Dates & Pricing

July 26, 2022 – August 06, 2022 Space Available

Weather Varies

We wish we could control the weather, but on the day this tour begins you can expect temperatures (°C) within this range:

Rocky Harbour

Highs16
Lows2

St. Anthony

Highs12
Lows-1

Port au Choix

Highs15
Lows2

Itinerary

Cruise sheer-walled fjords, be amazed by the majestic icebergs, walk through diverse landscapes from windswept shorelines to sub-Arctic summits. Xplore rare geological oddities that earned Gros Morne UNESCO World Heritage status, listen to tales of Vikings and relax amid the culture and hospitality of Newfoundland’s coastal communities. 

Day 1 – Home Cities to Deer Lake.

Fly from home city to Deer Lake, transfer to your hotel.

Day 2 – Deer Lake to Rocky Harbour

Depart for Gros Morne National Park. Visit the Discovery Centre, then Xplore the unique and rare “Tablelands” on a guided interpretive walk, where this barren landscape is exposed to you in a way few have had the opportunity to see it. Then onto the tiny fishing village of Trout River, enjoy some free time; grab some lunch, stroll the boardwalk, purchase a pair of socks off the clothesline?  Or head out on one of the many fabulous hiking trails before we head north to our home for the next two nights in Rocky Harbour. Tonight, enjoy a Welcome Dinner with your fellow xplorers.

Day 3 – Rocky Harbour

In the morning we venture onto the water of Bonne Bay, kayaking through pristine water, view; quaint coastal villages, take in the spectacular views all around, watch the Bald Eagles soar. Be sure to keep your eyes open to catch a glimpse of the elusive Minke Whales that frequent Bonne Bay.   In the afternoon, we Xplore a couple of the great nature walks offered in the Norris Bay area.  After our adventurous day, enjoy the opportunity to relax, or take in more of Rocky Harbour on your own.  There is no party like a Newfoundland Kitchen Party! This evening we partake in this lively local tradition. Sing along, and even grab your own traditional Newfoundland instrument and play along with the band. Get Screeched in! No trip to Newfoundland can be complete without partaking in this unique ceremony that will get your tongue in a twist, put hairs on your chest, and make you an honorary Newfoundlander in the process!

Day 4 – Rocky Harbour to Port au Choix

Our adventures continue today as we drive further into Gros Morne National Park, stopping at Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse.  Take a short walk around “The Head” while taking in some of the most spectacular and picturesque views in Gros Morne National Park.  We’ll enjoy a cup of tea and a warm biscuit as we listen to stories of the past and the people who lived on this rugged and beautiful headland.   Then it’s time to stretch our legs on a 45- minute walk across a “mish” where at the end, you are rewarded with the beautiful and rare Western Brook Pond.  We board our vessel for a 2-hour boat tourfara í víking”, along this 16km, spectacular glacier-carved, land-locked fjord, view; waterfalls cascading from 2000 feet above, that often turn to mist before reaching the pond; billion-year-old cliffs and frequent wildlife sightings.  Once docked, we make our way to Port au Choix for the next two nights.

Day 5 – Port au Choix

Today we learn the 6,000-year-old story of Port au Choix as we Xplore Port au Choix National Historic Site.  Hike coastal trails see prehistoric artifacts from four ancient Aboriginal cultures that inhabited Newfoundland’s rugged northwest coast.   Examine the past at the Port au Choix Visitor Centre, featuring both cultural & historical exhibits.  Walk in the footsteps of the ancient cultures that first inhabited this spectacular landscape, in search of a sculpture series that celebrates the Indigenous heritage of this remarkable place.  Xplore the limestone barrens, looking for plants and fossils found nowhere else in Canada, take in panoramic ocean views, did someone say whales and icebergs!  Weave through a tuckamore forest and cross an ancient limestone seabed to reach Point Riche Lighthouse.

Day 6 – Port au Choix to L’Anse-au-Clair, Labrador

This morning it’s off to St. Barbe, where we catch the ferry over to Labrador.  Travelling through “Iceberg Alley” you’ll have a great opportunity to marvel at majestic icebergs and breaching whales.  Between 1530-1600, the large numbers of whales in this area drew up to 2000 whalers from the Basque region of Spain and France to the Strait of Belle Isle, where they established a major whaling port at Red Bay. For some 70 years, Basque whalers made the dangerous, month-long journey across the Atlantic to hunt whales and produce the oil that lit the lamps of Europe.  We stop at the Red Bay National Historic Site, enjoy Bites of Basque History, hear the stories passed down through generations, music with a 16th-century flair and taste a mouth-watering selection of Basque pintxos (little bites) prepared by a local chef - not to mention viewing the many original Basque artifacts and restored “chalupa” at this UNESCO World Heritage Site.  After a day of Xploring, your appetite will be ready for the hardy dinner (Whalers Restaurant) planned this evening!               

Day 7 – L’Anse-au-Clair to St. Anthony

We depart Labrador today but not before Xploring the Jersey Trail, an easy walk, weaving our way across the bench land, above you, cliffs with a Stonehenge like feel, ancient weathered boulders and cliffs that make for interesting scenery.  The trail tells the story of early settlers, primarily those from Jersey in the Channel Islands that established a fishery here in the 1800’s.  One more stop at Point Amour Lighthouse before heading to the ferry terminal.  Climb to the top of the tallest lighthouse in Atlantic Canada - the second tallest in Canada! After climbing 132 steps, be rewarded with a fantastic panoramic view of the Strait of Belle Isle. You might spot an iceberg, a whale breaching, or groups of seabirds flying along the shore, it’s the perfect perch for an incredible photo opportunity.  It’s a short drive to the ferry terminal to board the ferry back to Newfoundland and our home for the next two nights in the beautiful fishing village of St. Anthony.  Be prepared for some local entertainment this evening at the Great Viking Feast!

Day 8 – St. Anthony

St. Anthony is known as the iceberg and whale watching capital of Newfoundland!   This morning we join an experienced local naturalist to do just that, we’ll Xplore the scenic St. Anthony coast; an area that typically has more icebergs, humpbacks and dolphins than any other region in Newfoundland. Guided by our trusted captain, relax in the comforts of a 50-foot vessel while being entertained by traditional music, stories and interpretation on the unique heritage. It’s a refreshing blend of nature, fun education and Newfoundland hospitality that you won’t soon forget. The afternoon hike is an easy 3.4 km loop, followed by a visit to the Grenfell House Museum and the Jordi Bonet Murals.  This evening Immerse yourself in the Viking Age at the only authenticated Norse site in North America. Gather around the skáli “kitchen” in one of L’Anse aux Meadows sod buildings, spend the evening by the fire with the Vikings of Straumfjörð and toast the heroic deeds of Leif Eriksson and his crew as the Vinland Sagas of tragic tales and Norse myths are retold in the place where it all began

Day 9 – St. Anthony to Plum Point

After our evening with the Vikings we get out this morning to Xplore the land the Vikings once walked on as we tour the only known Viking site in the Americas and the earliest known evidence of European presence in North America.  See original 11th century artifacts at L’Anse aux Meadows UNESCO World Heritage Site, stroll in the footsteps of the Vikings and experience Norse life at the Viking Encampment.  This afternoon, we Xplore the local trails see rare 650 million-year-old fossil structures on the world-famous Thrombolite Walking Trail, in the picturesque community of Flowers’s Cove, near the top of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula, one of only two places in the world where you can view these gigantic phenomena, living fossils dating back 570 million years.  After our Thrombolite adventure, we head back to Marjorie’s Bridge for some photos, drop by the “Skin Boot” Church and then take a trip down the White Rocks Trail.   This evening we get together for an authentic Newfoundland Mug Up.

Day 10 – Plum Point to Deer Lake

This morning we travel to the charming traditional fishing community of Daniel’s Harbour, home to legendary Nurse Myra Bennett, dubbed the Florence Nightingale of the North.  Walk along Bill’s Woods Trail providing wonderful views of the mountains.  Stop at Arches Provincial Park, where the ancient limestone has been pounded by eons of surf to carve out scenic arches.  Walk under the arches, or on top of them to experience the awesome strength of the sea.  Enjoy some free time in Rocky Harbour meandering through the craft shops before gathering with your fellow Xplorers for our Farewell Dinner this evening.

Day 11 – Deer Lake to Home Cities

Transfer from hotel to Deer Lake Airport

What you will experience on this tour

Cruise sheer-walled fjords, be amazed by the majestic icebergs, walk through diverse landscapes from windswept shorelines to sub-Arctic summits. Xplore rare geological oddities that earned Gros Morne UNESCO World Heritage status, listen to tales of Vikings and relax amid the culture and hospitality of Newfoundland’s coastal communities. 

Tablelands

Half a billion years in the making – the result of a brilliant coming together of two ancient continents -- the Earth's inner soul: the mantle - exposed to you the way few have seen it.  Walk upon the Earth's Mantle - normally found far below the crust. This walk reveals earth shaking ideas that change how we understand our planet. Parks Canada guides will help you explore this bizarre and beautiful landscape, its glacial carved valleys and the unique vegetation that call the Tablelands home. This 2-hour guided walk will prepare you to better understand the world significant geology of Gros Morne as you explore the park.  A landscape described as a “geologist’s dream”! Pushed in place as continents collided almost half a billion years ago, its orange weathered rock is from the middle layer of the Earth and shaped by glaciers less than 15,000 years ago.   

Anchor's Aweigh

Not to be missed, the finest musical experience in Gros Morne.  A blend of fun, comedy, and nostalgia - a tap your feet and clap your hands evening. A taste of Newfoundland humour without being over the top.  The Anchors Aweigh Band show is a must on the list of things to do for both residents and visitors. Filled with renditions of popular Newfoundland and Labrador songs and tunes, sprinkled with one-liners and wit, and a display of culture, this very talented group of five local musicians is one of the most widely attended acts in the whole province. Visitors come from far and wide to see this performance!

Jacob A. Crocker House and Interpretation Centre

This is one of two museums in town and is a fascinating insight into a salt box house and a bygone way of life. Lots of items crammed into a small space and has a lived in, homely feel.

Bonne Bay, Kayaking

Accompanied by our Paddle Canada certified guides we first receive an introduction to kayaking and to Bonne Bay. We paddle off in the morning, in our stable sea kayaks, when the winds are typically lighter, to Xplore the coastline of this double-armed fjord.  The inner bay consists of two arms, the South and East Arms, both are considered fjords with high cliffs and communities on the water's edge, with many wooded coves that provide great landing beaches.  Bonne Bay is a sea kayaker’s paradise with its pristine waters, quaint coastal villages and spectacular views of the Tablelands, Gros Morne Mountain and the Long-Range Mountains.  Minke whales are frequent visitors and throughout the whole paddling season you can view bald eagles, common and Arctic terns, sea stars, sea urchins, lush kelp beds and colourful seaweeds.

Kitchen Party

Like other folk traditions, Newfoundland and Labrador music first evolved as a pastime shared among friends, neighbours and co-workers. Many tunes and ballads were well known in homes and workplaces long before they were heard in more formal settings. The evolution of Celtic-based music, in particular, cannot be separated from the daily life of early settlers. Jigs and reels were played for dancing, "chin music" originated as a way to sing a tune when no instruments were available, shanties were matched to the rhythms of manual labour and ballads were, among other things, stories told to help pass long and uneventful evenings. More formal musical performances were usually reserved for church services, spiritual music having been sung and played since the first settlements were established and first churches built. Military and church bands also provided entertainment during public occasions and ceremonies.

Screech In

“Is ye a Screecher?” asks the master of ceremonies. You reply, “Deed I is, me old cock, and long may your big jib draw!” (You just said: “Indeed, I am, my old friend, and may there always be wind in your sails!”).  This ritual, called a Screech-in, is a satirical tribute to the history of Newfoundland and Labrador. During the triangular trade, the region exchanged salted codfish, its once-primary export, for the West Indies’ rum. Later picking up the name “Screech,” the amber liquor became intertwined with local culture—one writer described the history of Newfoundland as “a long battle between rum and religion.” Today, Screech is 80-proof, locally bottled Jamaican rum, and it plays an important role in initiating visitors into Newfie culture.  Screech-ins allow locals to lampoon outmoded stereotypes. Most Newfies are no longer cod fishermen, but they enjoy letting visitors in on their sense of humor, their history, and their hooch. The best way to become an honorary Newfie? Laugh at yourself. Learning to love Screech wouldn’t hurt, either.  Now if you just can’t wait to be Screeched-in, you can start practicing the creed everyone recites together:  “From the waters of the Avalon, to the shores of Labrador, we’ve always stuck together, with a rant and a roar.  To those who’ve never been, soon they’ll understand, from coast to coast, we raise a toast, we love thee Newfoundland!

Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse

Lobster Cove Head has always been a place of gathering, refuge and celebration – a uniting force between strangers and families alike. Enjoy a cup of tea and a warm biscuit with a Parks Canada guide. Listen to the stories of the people who lived on this rugged and beautiful headland. Compliment the experience with a short self-guided walk around “the Head” and take in some of the most spectacular and picturesque views in Gros Morne National Park.

Western Brook Pond

The pond, located in the long-Range Mountains, the most northern section of the Appalachian Mountains surrounded by deep rock walls.  The pond is a 16 km long freshwater fjord carved out by glaciers during the ice age 25,000 to 10,000 years ago. Its water is extremely pure and reaches depths of 165 feet.  Well, words and photos will never demonstrate the magnitude and beauty of the fjord, there is no better way to explore this scenic delight than by taking the Western Brook Pond Boat Tour providing live interpretation on the geological and historical features of this wonder of nature. The lake waters are pristine, having had very little impact from human activities. Vessels operating on the pond, must have special certification from Parks Canada and have minimal impact on the environment. On board, behold the spectacular glacier-carved land-locked fjord, waterfalls cascading from 2000 feet that often turn to mist before reaching the pond, billion-year-old cliffs, and frequent wildlife sightings.  This special place is truly a photographer’s paradise providing stunning images waiting to be captured.

Port au Choix National Historic Site

This National Historic Site is in the community of Port au Choix on the west coast of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula.  Take in the ocean smells and experience the hospitality of this rural community.  The Visitor Reception Centre explores the 6,000-year-old story of Port au Choix in an exhibit featuring a full-scale Dorset house diorama, displays of ancient tools and culture. Visiting the Maritime Archaic Peoples Sacred Burial Ground in the town of Port au Choix complements the cultural experiences in this area. Walk in the footsteps of the ancient cultures that first inhabited this spectacular landscape.  Cape Bonavista to Point Riche, an area known as the French Shore, belonged to the French from 1713 until 1763, when the region was redefined as being from Cape St. John to Cape Ray. In 1904, France finally surrendered its rights to the Newfoundland shore.

Point Riche Lighthouse

Point Riche Lighthouse, a "pepperpot" lighthouse, was built in 1892 and is still active.  Located at the seaward tip of the Point Riche peninsula, the windswept station site makes up part of the outermost edge of Port au Choix National Historic Park and is a distinct landmark in the province. The first lighthouse at Point Riche, formerly part of the French Shore, was completed by the Canadian government in 1871 to assist steamers transiting the Strait of Belle Isle on their voyages between the St. Lawrence and Europe. Point Riche Lighthouse was destroyed by fire on August 15, 1890. During the summer of 1892, the present octagonal wooden lighthouse was rebuilt and is guiding passage through the Strait of Belle Isle today.  Point Riche Lighthouse, a "pepperpot" lighthouse, was built in 1892 and is still active.  Located at the seaward tip of the Point Riche peninsula, the windswept station site makes up part of the outermost edge of Port au Choix National Historic Park and is a distinct landmark in the province. The first lighthouse at Point Riche, formerly part of the French Shore, was completed by the Canadian government in 1871 to assist steamers transiting the Strait of Belle Isle on their voyages between the St. Lawrence and Europe. Point Riche Lighthouse was destroyed by fire on August 15, 1890. During the summer of 1892, the present octagonal wooden lighthouse was rebuilt and is guiding passage through the Strait of Belle Isle today. 

Iceberg Alley

It’s estimated between 400 and 800 medium and large icebergs flow along Iceberg Alley every year. The enormous chunks of ice are approximately 10,000 years old. As for the expression “tip of the iceberg,” it comes from the fact that only about 10 percent of the iceberg is above water. All six types of icebergs can be viewed as they pass through Iceberg Alley. It was one of these icebergs that in 1912 sank the Titanic off the coast of Newfoundland. Nowadays, icebergs are monitored using satellites to track them and the local breweries use the pure water of these icebergs to make vodka, gin, rum, and beer.

Red Bay National Historic

In the 1500s, the waters of Red Bay were thick with right and bowhead whales. Whalers from the Basques regions of Spain and France established a major whale port here. On the shores of Red Bay, the Basques rendered whale oil that lit the lamps of Europe. Today, you can wander around the former whaling town and UNESCO World Heritage Site and immerse yourself in the traditional life of a Basques whaler.  Take a hike along the beach and step into the interpretation centre to see an eight-metre chalupa, which whalers used on the ocean to harpoon their giant catch. To get a full appreciation for the size of these whales, compare the chalupa to the assembled collections of whalebones displayed. These showcase a time of prosperity and dangerous adventure, illustrating a long-ago way of life.

Jersey Train

Great walk starting in town, and going in either direction, you've got between 3 and 6 km of walking on a heritage trail along the seashore barrens, with interpretive signs. The trail is crushed stone, as it weaves along boulder fields, tuckamore, and grass. The trail tells the story of the early settlers, primarily those from Jersey in the Channel Islands (Islands between France and England). The destination is the archaeological dig area (the foundations of the Jersey rooms) where more interpretive signs describe the fishing rooms and the families that once inhabited them in the mid-19th century. Fortunately, local historians interviewed the elderly residents who could recall enough history about what it was like to live and work here. Certainly, the lifestyle was "all hands on deck" to prosper and live well. Above you, cliffs with a Stonehenge like feel, ancient weathered boulders and cliffs that make for interesting scenery. Wildflowers abound, at time even the whales wanted to come out and play. In days gone by, these footpaths were used to link communities and were the only way to get from one village to the next. Based on the ancient footpaths that residents and shipwreck survivors used, it's all there for today's hiker to explore.

Point Amour Lighthouse

Provincial Historic Site.  Imagine... you're at the top of the tallest lighthouse in Atlantic Canada, there's an iceberg, a whale breaching, and the HMS Raleigh shipwreck in the distance.... Coastal hikes, wildflowers, fossils, and the oldest burial mound in North America. Get your hiking shoes on and your camera ready. Climb to the top of the tallest lighthouse in Atlantic Canada - the second tallest in Canada! After climbing 132 steps, be rewarded with a fantastic panoramic view of the Strait of Belle Isle. Perhaps you will spot an iceberg, a whale breaching, or groups of seabirds flying along the shore. Point Amour Lighthouse is a lot more than a great view... it's a snapshot of life on the Straits, set in a spectacular landscape

Great Viking Feast

Enjoy an evening of food, fun, and feuds at the Great Viking Feast! Come to Leifsburdir and be part of a Viking court of law while feasting on an all you can eat buffet of the food that the Vikings may have enjoyed. Listen to the Vikings and customers make their case to the Lawspeaker and then decide on their fate and punishment. Join the crew and become an honorary Viking and take away a certificate to prove it.

Iceberg and Whale Watching Boat Tour

Xplore the scenic St. Anthony coast; an area that typically has more icebergs, humpbacks and dolphins then any other region in NL. Sightings of minke, fin whales and orca whales are also common. Visit nesting colonies of eider ducks, kittewakes and black guillemots. Relax in the comforts of a 50-foot vessel while being entertained by traditional music, stories and interpretation on the unique Newfoundland heritage. It’s a refreshing blend of nature, fun education and hospitality that you will never forget.

Grenfell House Museum

Built between 1909 and 1910 the Grenfell House was the home of Dr. Grenfell, his wife and their three children. The house has seen many changes throughout its history with rooms and chimneys being added and taken away. Originally, standing alone on the hill, the house became known as the "castle" with flower beds and vegetable gardens. Now taken over by wildflowers and shaded by trees, it offers a quiet welcome to visitors.

Jordi Bonet Murals

These ceramic murals were created and fabricated by Montreal artist Jordi Bonet in 1967. One is immediately struck by the beauty and harmony of design and color. The tones of grey, blue, brown and jewel-like brilliance make the past come to life. Each of the eight murals has meaning relating to the people of Newfoundland and Labrador, their lives, or the country in which they live. These murals are part of the Grenfell Historic Properties and a must see on any stop in St. Anthony.

An evening with Viking’s

Gather around the skáli “kitchen” in one of L’Anse aux Meadows sod building’s, raise your glass with a Viking for an evening of heroic and tragic tales of Viking Sagas at the only authenticated Norse site in North America. Let the fire warm you as our Viking interpreters lead you on an expedition of adventure and exploration through storytelling.  Find yourself immersed in Norse culture and provided a small taste of Vinland through story and song.

Viking Encampment. L’Anse aux Meadows UNESCO World Heritage Site -

Discovery is a fearless pursuit. Certainly, this was the case when the Vikings, the first Europeans recorded to reach the new world, landed at L'Anse aux Meadows over 1,000 years ago.  Curious about how the Vikings lived and worked? Visit with merchant-adventurer Finn, his wife Thora, the blacksmith Ragnar and other members of the crew to hear tales of trade, Norse society and how to turn bog iron ore into nails. Check out their weaponry, tools, cooking utensils and reproductions of many artifacts representing everyday living.

Flowers Cove, Marjorie’s Bridge and Thrombolite Walking Trail

Experience the Cove located on the Great Northern Peninsula.  It may seem hard to believe today, but years ago before the construction of the Viking Trail highway, Marjorie’s Bridge was the only way to get across Lawless Brook on your way up or down the coast of the Great Northern Peninsula. That is, if you weren’t walking. Today, the bridge, while was originally constructed over 100 years ago, it was lovingly restored and named after Marjorie “Burke” Myers, who is the daughter and granddaughter of the two men that originally built the bridge.  The bridge connects to a walking trail from Burke’s Road to Lawless Point called the Thrombolite Trail.  Staying close to the water you may catch sight of whales and icebergs going through the Strait of Belle Isle!  Thrombolites are primitive life forms, bun-shaped, these unicellular critters left a good size trace of their existence in the fossil record.  The trail allows you to Xplore these rare 650 million-year-old fossil structures in this picturesque setting near the top of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula. The Thrombolites are 650 million-year-old critically endangered fossil structures, resembling the earliest forms of life on earth. They were the only known forms of life on earth 3.5 billion to 650 million years ago. They’re often referred to as “living rocks,” and the only other place in the world where you can see them is Australia.   You don’t need to know geology, to realize they are pretty special! 

White Rocks Trail – Peer into clefts eroded deep in the limestone pavement and discover

White Rocks Trail

 Peer into clefts eroded deep in the limestone pavement and discover plants growing in shady rock gardens.

Daniel’s Harbour

Daniel's Harbour was home to Nurse Myra Bennett, one of the Northern Peninsula's most famous residents. She was once dubbed 'The Florence Nightingale of Newfoundland'. She was the only medical assistance for people living in the outport communities on the west coast for more than 50 years. Nurse Bennett's house is now a museum featuring period furniture and medical instruments.

Arches Provincial Park

Ancient limestone carved by eons of pounding surf created the Arches, a natural rock formation known throughout the province. Take the trail leading to the huge rocks, you can walk under the Arches or on top of them and feel the awesome strength of the sea

 

 

Dates & Pricing

Cruise sheer-walled fjords, be amazed by the majestic icebergs, walk through diverse landscapes from windswept shorelines to sub-Arctic summits. Xplore rare geological oddities that earned Gros Morne UNESCO World Heritage status, listen to tales of Vikings and relax amid the culture and hospitality of Newfoundland’s coastal communities. 

 

July 26, 2022 – August 06, 2022 Space Available


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Cruise sheer-walled fjords, be amazed by the majestic icebergs, walk through diverse landscapes from windswept shorelines to sub-Arctic summits. Xplore rare geological oddities that earned Gros Morne UNESCO World Heritage status, listen to tales of Vikings and relax amid the culture and hospitality of Newfoundland’s coastal communities. 

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